Site Content

advising

The First Job Advice Letter

It is coming down to the end of the semester and the Class of 2014 will very soon leave us for Whatever’s Next.  For some of them it will be their first real job.  For others, graduate or professional school.  Others are still looking for employment; fear not - 98% of the graduating class of 2013 was in either jobs or graduate school within 6 months of graduation (with 77% of the class reporting).

Your seniors have had four years to learn the Wake Forest system and figure out what to do and how to do it.  Soon they are going to have to learn a new system and new expectations at their first destination after college, be it in a job, graduate school, etc.

I had a wonderful young Wake Forester that I mentored a few years ago, and when he left for his first job, this letter below was my parting gift to him.

As with The Worry Letter that was featured in the Daily Deac last fall, I invite you to write your own First Job Advice letter to your senior.  (Or start thinking about what you would say to your student when his/her time to graduate comes).  We might not agree on all the items in the letter – and that’s OK.  Think about your jobs and your successes (and failures) and decide what you would say.  This might make a nice and heartfelt graduation gift.

—————

I have been thinking a lot about what I want to say to you as you leave for your new job.  I am sad for Wake Forest and happy for you, and I understand your trepidation to leave what you know and venture into something new.  Change is scary.

You are smart and talented and have a wonderful character, and those are all the building blocks you are going to need to be successful.  Don’t worry about where your new colleagues are from or feel like their schools or their pedigrees are better.  I mean it when I say I would bet on you against anyone else.

If you want my unsolicited advice, I will put on my mentor hat and give it to you.  A lot of these are things about work that I had to learn the hard way, and I am firm believer in paying it forward and trying to spare other people the agony of learning from mistakes.  You are starting in a new place and you want to make a good impression, so here’s what I’ve learned as my best guidelines for work:

  • When you first take a job, you need to pay your dues.  People are watching.  Come to work early and leave late.  Do not clock watch.  There will come a time – after you have earned your stripes – that you can adjust your hours.  But it isn’t now.  Even if your other friends leave early, stay longer than they do.
  • Observe the people who have been at the company for a while.  Who appears to be well respected? Figure out why.  Who gets talked about in bad terms? Figure out why.
  • Emulate the people who are respected and successful – and be sure not to be fooled simply by who is popular.  You want who is well-regarded.
  • Look for what isn’t being said along with what is.  Notice people’s body language.
  • Find a mentor.  Someone who can help you navigate the organizational waters and be a Sherpa.  Look for someone who seems to have a heart for helping younger people, and be sure this is someone in the Well Regarded group.
  • At some point you’ll make a mistake and your boss (or another colleague) will give you feedback.  The natural reaction is to explain what you did and why and get defensive.  When we are mentally trying to justify how we can explain our actions, sometimes we’ll stop hearing the feedback and we risk losing the lesson.  Instead, be silent and absorb it, even if it’s painful.  Thank the person for the feedback, and mean it.  Ask them what they would have liked to see you do differently.  And then next time, be sure to do it.
  • There should be no job you are above doing.  Don’t pass off the stuff you hate to your assistant or someone lower on the totem pole.  If there’s unpleasant stuff to do, do it yourself (or offer to help the colleague).
  • There are people in every organization who aren’t at the top of the corporate ladder, but they are the right arm of teams or bosses, the ones who get things done, gatekeepers.  Get to know them – learn their names, ask about their kids, listen to their stories.  Don’t just pay lip service to those things – mean it.  Be genuinely interested.  And always, always treat them with respect.
  • Never lord your education (or your salary) over other people with less.  Treat the CEO and the janitor with the same amount of politeness and dignity.  Everyone will notice.
  • Don’t feel obliged to try and be someone you aren’t.  If you don’t want to hang out with the young colleagues in your group until 2 am, don’t.
  • Be cautious about dating people in your office.  If the relationship goes badly, you have to see that person all the time.
  • One of the most profound gifts you can give other people is your undivided attention.  Learn to listen well and really hear people and focus when they are talking to you.
  • Make the choice to be ethical every day.  Plenty of other people won’t be.  At the end of the day, all you have is your character and your reputation.  Once you stain those, the memory lasts for a long time.
  • Pay it forward and mentor the next generation.

You’ve been a star at Wake Forest.  Now it’s just going to be in someone else’s sky and not Wake Forest’s.  But you will still be a star.

Catching Up from Last Week

The staff of the Daily Deac had a week’s vacation last week, and it looks like we picked an eventful week to be gone.  As you have surely seen by now, Wake has a new basketball coach in Danny Manning.  Here is the official email I received from Ron Wellman, our Athletic Director.

—————-

I am pleased to announce that Danny Manning is our new basketball coach. Known as one of the most accomplished college basketball players in the history of the sport, Danny has played for and worked under a number of legendary coaches and he has been successful in his coaching career. 

Danny has spent the last two seasons as the head coach at the University of Tulsa. He was named the 2013-14 Conference USA Coach of the Year after leading the Golden Hurricane to the conference championship and a berth in the second round of the NCAA Tournament, Tulsa’s first appearance since 2003.  Manning is currently a finalist for two national Coach of the Year awards including the Jim Phelan Award, to the nation’s top coach, and the Ben Jobe Award, given to the nation’s top minority coach.

We are excited to have Danny as a Demon Deacon, and I hope you will join me in welcoming him, his wife Julie, and their children Taylor and Evan to Wake Forest University! I look forward to introducing Danny to the Wake Forest community next week. 

Go Deacs!

Ron Wellman

————–

The full press release on Coach Manning is available online here.   This is an unconfirmed report, but I had a friend message me yesterday saying that Coach Manning will be introduced to campus on the Quad this Tuesday at 6 pm.  I am trying to find out whether or not that’s true.

In campus news, this week your students are going through Round 2 of registration for fall classes.    They will also be going through residence hall selection and meal plan selection.  If your students have questions about either process, the best places to start are the websites, and then they can talk to their RA or Residence Life or Campus Dining if they have more detailed questions.

Many of you have started thinking about summer storage and shipping options for your Deacs’ belongings.  If your student needs to purchase boxes and tape and just needs to ship items home, our own on-campus Mail Services can provide those options.  They ship belongings home, but do not store boxes for the summer.   Your student can check out the Mail Services office in the basement of Benson University Center to discuss his/her box and shipping needs.

For students who want to ship their belongings home at the end of the semester (or have them stored in Winston-Salem over the summer), Wake Forest has a relationship with Eli’s Pack and Ship.  For more details, see the phone and website information below: 

Eli’s Pack & Ship
Eli Bradley
336.721.0596
www.elispackandship.com

Families are welcome to select their own vendors or service providers.  However, this company is one with whom Wake Forest has an existing vendor relationship.

It was a beautiful weekend in Winst0n-Salem, if a little chilly yesterday.  This morning there is nothing but grey skies and rain, and it looks like the rain will continue all day.   But if the 5-day forecast holds, it will be 74 by Friday, which is the first of our two Campus Days for Accepted Students.  Nothing beats the Wake Forest campus when it is mid 70s and sunny.

Have a great week, Deac families!

Not Too Soon to Think About Summer School

First of all, for our parents and families reading this morning and worrying about the weather and travel conditions: as of 7:45 this morning, it was cold and rainy but I did not experience any ice at all on the roads.  There was a bit of ice on power lines and trees, but the roads were only wet, not icy.  At least in the 3-4 miles from my house to campus.  So if your students are driving today – to airports or even farther home – please tell them to be cautious and be aware of road conditions.  But right around campus, my roads at least were fine, if wet.

Now on to the real meat of the day: here’s an idea that you may want to consider discussing with your Deac during Thanksgiving – Summer School.  Courses for summer 2014 are available for browsing now.

Yes, I know that seems a very long time away, but Summer School is a great option for a lot of different scenarios:

1) the “hard class” – many of my advisees have gone to Summer School because they know they have a hard class coming up.  That might be a divisional requirement, or a prerequisite for their intended major (I see a lot of Accounting 111 and Organic Chemistry for these).  It helps these students to be able to focus on just one class, without the distraction of  a full campus of friends, social activities, etc.

2) the “catch up” – some of our students deliberately take fewer than 15 credits a semester their first year and come to Summer School to ‘catch up.’  They might have elected to slow the pace of their scholarship because they wanted to be sure to get a solid start their first semester, or because they were on a sports team and needed a lighter schedule for practices, or because they were going Greek.  Summer allows time to catch up and get back on schedule.

3) the “cover a lot of ground” class – there are a couple of Summer School classes where you can get a lot more credit in a shorter period of time.  There is a terrific Summer Management Program that allows non-business majors to get 8 hours of class credit, and an Intensive Summer Language Institute that combines the 153 and 212 levels of Spanish into one course.

Students can visit the Summer School website or go to their office (across from the Office of Academic Advising off the Reynolda Hall lobby) to learn more.

This is a great option for many students, so look into it!

Some Musings on Registration

Happy Friday, Deac families!   If you are not aware, we have designated Fridays as Black and Gold Friday, which means we hope you are wearing black and gold (or even better, official WFU apparel) wherever you are.  You can help us boost school spirit and name recognition by representing Wake Forest wherever you live – so join us and go black and gold every Friday.

It’s a big day on campus with the dedication of Farrell Hall later today.  That is going to be an incredible event, so I hope your students attend any parts of the day they can.  And because it is Friday, this is your gentle reminder to call your Deac today and give them that unconscious reminder of home, which tends to reduce risky behavior.

Coming up next week is spring 2014 course registration, and that is certainly figuring in to students’ minds.  Here are some musings about registration.

- Students (or authorized parents/family members) need to check the student’s financial account to ensure there are no unpaid balances or registration holds.   Check it now, pay any balance off, and check it again the day before AND day of registration, just to be sure.  An unpaid balance could be even just a nominal charge from a parking ticket, student health bill, etc.

- Registration is scheduled AFTER 5 pm.  This came at the request of Student Government several years ago, who wanted registration to take place after most classes have ended.  The one catch to this is that administrative offices are closed after 5 pm, so if your student doesn’t check his/her financial account during the business day and finds there is an unpaid balance, he/she will be blocked from registering until the account can be settled the next business day.  So please, please check that account balance and clear any holds.

- In talking to some students (my own advisees and others) as well as other academic advisers, some students seem to be feeling some uncertainty about their potential major choice because they don’t think they are going to love ALL the requirements.  For example, a student who loves psychology but isn’t a huge fan of math may be rethinking that major because he doesn’t want to take Research Methods, or a student who loves modern American lit might be a little hesitant to declare an English major because she doesn’t want to take one of the “Single Author” courses (Shakespeare, Chaucer, Milton, or James Joyce).  VERY rarely will a student love ALL the requirements for a major.  So if your student is worrying about a major because of just one course, encourage him or her that it is normal to feel that way.

- Because Wake Forest students are high achieving and want to do well, they tend to be pretty worried about GPA.  This can lead to students trying to determine class schedules based on perceived reputation of what will be an easier class, easier professor, easier grading.   This is not the ideal way to search for classes.  Students should take a class because they are interested in the course material, not because they think it will be an easy grade.  If your student is deeply interested in Middle East history, for example, I would argue he should take that class rather than a class on Medieval history (if the only reason he is taking the Medieval class is because he has heard the class is easier).  My own experience was that when I was really intrigued by the subject, I did not mind working harder in a class.  Far better to work more in a class that stimulates you than slog through a class that you have chosen simply because you think it might have fewer tests or papers.

- Contrary to popular opinion, 8 am classes are not a tragedy.  If there is a class your student needs and the only open section is at 8 am, your student should think about signing up for it.

- Finally, urge your students not to stress out too much about registration – particularly our first-year students.  Between basic requirements and divisional requirements, they have a LOT of courses to take.  And so there will be time to take care of them.  So jump in and register for the best classes they can, and try not to worry!

 

Finally – Cold

It is cold this morning, Deac families.  Very cold.  Like 36 degrees, frost on the ground, heavy coat cold.  This is about as cold as it has been this fall, and the trend looks to continue over the next few days.  Doesn’t appear we we reach a high in the 60s again until Sunday.

This has not been a spectacular fall for beautiful leaves and foliage.  It’s a shame, because when the fall leaves turn and they are at their best, the campus and surrounding areas are aflame with reds and oranges and yellows.  My favorite drive during the fall is down Reynolda Road, in between Reynolda Village/Reynolda House and Graylyn International Conference Center.  Reynolda Road is lined on both sides with old trees whose branches come up over the road, giving it some shade, and when those trees are at their peak, it is beyond beautiful.  I don’t know if we got too much rain this summer, or too little, or what, but the leaves just aren’t grand.  Too bad.   Or maybe it is just too soon, and another week or two will bring us the best of the leaves.  Let us hope.

I did stumble upon something very fun and cool to look at, though, and that is pictures from the President’s Ball, which was held for students (and interested faculty, staff, and alumni) during Homecoming weekend.  If you want to take a gander at students in their finery and dancing (or posing for photos) with great glee – you can see them here.

For those of you on Twitter, you may have seen the hashtag #WFUTaughtme.  It’s a way for students and alumni to show their appreciation for the lessons learned here on campus.  This is part of a broader Teacher Appreciation Week this week, and there are some wonderful and compelling notes, tweets, and pictures on this Weebly site.  There are a lot of great messages here, and I started to post some of them here, but I kept on finding other ones I did not want to pass over – and my list was getting too long!

Really – visit the site!!!  It will make you feel wonderful about the remarkable faculty teaching your students, and will make you feel wonderful to see what our alumni think about their alma mater.

 

Some Thoughts on Upcoming Registration

Registration for spring semester 2014 classes will begin the first week of November, so students who have not yet declared a major (aka first-years and sophomores) are beginning to be contacted by their academic advisers to set up one-on-one meetings about class selection.  The Office of Academic Advising sent an email to academic advisers with some information about the advising period:

“The Fall Advising Period is from Oct. 21 – Nov. 1.  Registration starts the week of November 4, and will proceed in two rounds.  In the first round (Nov. 4 – Nov. 10, midnight) students can register for up to 8 hours.  In the second round (Nov. 11 on), students can complete registration up to 17 hours.  Each student can register at any time after his/her assigned time and up to the closing time for each round.  Registration times are set based on completed hours and apply to both rounds of registration, so most sophomores will be begin registration on Wednesday of each week and most first-year students on Thursday, although some will have earlier start times. “

If you are parents or family members of an undeclared student (i.e., first years and sophomores), here is some information about how your student might wish to prepare for his/her advising session.  (NOTE: The registration process is a little different for students who have declared a major – those academic paths are certainly more clear cut, and depending on the department, some people get registered via their department’s administrative assistant.)

Students are responsible for knowing the requirements and keeping track of which they have completed/which remain to be taken.  Our students are required to complete Basic and Divisional requirements.  There is a Course Completion Checklist students can use to see which courses count for which Basic and Divisional requirements, or students can also go into WIN and select Virtual Campus and Degree Evaluation to see what they have already taken and which requirements are not yet met.

So this might be the first step in their planning – what have I taken already? what do I still need to take? am I considering a major with prerequisites, and if so have I completed what I need to?

The second step might be to figure out which courses are being offered in the spring and of those, which ones interest the student the most?

To do this, students need to see which courses are being offered in the spring (not all classes are taught every semester).  Students can see the list of courses being taught in the spring by going into WIN, then choosing Info Central, then Forms and Documents Library, then Registrar, then Spring 2014 Class Schedule.PDF.  That PDF shows all the classes being taught in the spring.

Once the student knows which classes in a given department of interest are being taught, he/she can read the descriptions of classes being offered in the spring in the Undergraduate Bulletin, to see if the subject matter is of particular interest.  Sometimes reading the descriptions helps ignite a student’s desire for that class, or helps him see that the material covered is not something he would enjoy as much as a different class.

Finally, a student needs to consider multiple classes and options for the spring semester.  Depending on the student’s registration time (and the perceived popularity of the classes/professors the student wishes to take), he/she may need several different options.  For each of the classes I was trying to take (or time slots in my schedule I was trying to fill), I normally had 3-5 potential classes that could be slotted in there.

If your student can do all those things, and have some good sound reasoning about why he/she wants to take a particular class, the one-on-one meeting with the academic adviser will typically run very smoothly.

Remember, too, that the Office of Academic Advising is here as a resource.  Your students can make an appointment with one of the professional academic counselors there as a dry run before the meeting with the academic adviser.  Sometimes it helps to have multiple thinking partners in the process of considering courses.

And a VERY VERY important note for students: check your account to make sure there are no financial holds on their account.  Students will not be allowed to register for classes if there is any outstanding balance, and since registration takes place after normal business hours (at the request of students several years ago), there is no cashier to give that unpaid parking ticket fee to at 8 pm while you are supposed to be registering.  So students (or authorized parents), check DEAC for any balances now, and check again the day or two before your student registers.  Just in case.

—————

Finally, a very unrelated note, but since we have a lot of Daily Deac subscribers who get this emailed to you daily around the end of the day, I wanted to add a reminder about a campus event tomorrow.  There is a campuswide picnic starting at 11 am on the Mag (aka Manchester) Quad, and students can see a program in the giant tent at 12 noon and again at 1:30.  Please, please, urge them to attend.  This is a special opportunity and a big celebration, and I hope they take advantage of it!

Classes Have Begun

Classes started yesterday, and students got their first taste of their Tuesday-Thursday schedules.  Today is the first day of Monday-Weds-Fri classes.  I hit the ZSR Starbucks just before 8 am expecting to see at least a little bit of a logjam with students caffeinating up before class, but the place was empty save for one young man sporting a bit of stubble and a very large textbook.

Especially for first-year students, the start of classes can be stressful.  They are dealing with the newness of roommates, independent living, and now classes in unfamiliar turf with new expectations.  Always during the first week, I try to check in with my own advisees to see how things are going and to give a bit of a pep talk.  Here’s the advice I gave them.

—————–

Now that classes have started, I wanted to check in with you and send my best wishes that they will all go smoothly.  The first couple of days can be a bit unnerving as you get used to college classes but don’t worry – you’ll all find your way in no time at all.

Couple of important reminders:

1) any time you think you are struggling in a class, the first step is to go to your faculty member and talk about it/seek ideas for additional help

2) there is a math center, chem clinic, writing center, and learning assistance center (LAC does individual and group tutoring).  Go early if you think you need extra support.  Don’t wait.  You can find a lot of them here: http://parents.wfu.edu/wfu-links/ but you can also search on the main web site for their pages

3) Office of Academic Advising is there as a resource too.  Every M W F they post a list of classes with open spots if you are looking to switch: http://advising.wfu.edu/.  Pay attention also to the Dean Buchanan’s Top 10 Things

4)  The last date to add a class is Sept 10th.  IMPORTANT: the last day to drop is WAY later – Oct 1st.  You must be sure to have at least 12 credit hours in order to remain a full-time student.  Some students might need to add a new class first before dropping one, lest you dip below the 12 credit hour limit.   So if you think you might ultimately drop one of your current classes, pay attention to how many credits you’d have after that drop so you’d still have time to add a class if you need one.

5) Make sure to make your plan for homework and study time.  Procrastination will be a really hard thing to do here.

6) There are a lot of life adjustments happening right now.  Pay attention to your heart and spirit as well as your head.  The University Counseling center is a great resource if you are feeling overwhelmed or stressed.  It is free and confidential.  I highly recommend it.  http://counselingcenter.wfu.edu/

7) MODERATION in all things.  Don’t go crazy : )

Remember, you all earned your place here.  The work will be harder, and you are among very bright people – but don’t let that make you feel daunted.  Do the very best work you can, and let the chips fall where they may.  All you can do is your best, then let it rest.

 

Summer School and Registration

The first session of summer school is coming to a close, with finals taking place now.  Summer school is always a rigorous affair, because you are digesting a semester’s worth of material in about half the time.  But there are distinct advantages too – as a student, you have the ability to focus fully on a subject, away from all the distractions of a campus full of students during a regular semester.  So good luck to our summer school session 1 students – hope you do wonderfully on your finals.

For our incoming freshmen (or first-year students as we often call them), they will begin registering for up to 8 credit hours of their fall classes next week (July 8-12).  The Parent Programs office has received several calls and emails about registration and advice in recent days.  If you have questions about what your new student should be doing, here are a few resources that might be helpful:

Registration overview from the New Students web site as well as Registration FAQs.  For students considering a possible future in a professional program (pre-health, pre-business, etc.) please be sure to look at the Pre-Professional Advising site.

Advising section of the New Students web site – which includes links on how to Google chat with student advisers next week and how to talk to the Office of Academic Advising

Advice for new parents – there is a section on registration as well as general advice

A final word on advice for those new students who are about to register:  try to relax.  At the start of your WFU career, you will have to fulfill a lot of basic and divisional requirements, and there are many, many classes that count towards those ends.  A liberal arts education is about experiencing the wide smorgasbord of subjects – so enjoy the journey and you may just find you discover new academic passions!

 

WFU Master of Arts in Management

During the spring semester, it is natural for our seniors to be looking for their next step.  Hopefully most of them are taking advantage of all the opportunities in the Office of Personal and Career Development to help them align their educational and career goals.  Today we wanted to mention to parents a program that is available to our students.

Designed specifically for recent liberal arts, sciences or engineering graduates, Wake Forest offers a 10-month Master of Arts (MA) in Management program, which broadens students’ educations beyond the focus of their undergraduate studies.  This is a learning environment that is experiential and hands-on, emphasizing the value of teamwork and collaboration in solving problems.  It takes the solid liberal arts background a student has and adds the technical business skills needed to explore a wider range of career opportunities.  Students will get to work intimately with a company or organization through our Graduate Business Consulting projects in an effort to solve a real world problem they are facing.  Graduates of this program go on to find careers in a wide range of industries and geographic locations.

Real world example:  I knew a terrific young man who was a music major here on a Presidential Scholarship.  When he was a senior, he interviewed at several companies who liked him a lot, but said they wished he had a little more business knowledge.  He completed the MA in Management program and re-interviewed with some of the same companies he’d seen as a senior – and got the job of his choice.  He and his parents could not have been happier.

Here’s a testimonial from the mother of a “double Deac” who did the MA in Management program.  Lia Flur was a Political Science major here at Wake as an undergraduate and knew she wanted to explore the business realm.  She is now working as a Marketing Associate for the Advisory Board Company in D.C.

“The Wake Forest Master of Arts in Management Program had a profound impact on our daughter Lia’s professional growth. Wake Forest provides students a learning environment of collaboration. The faculty has an unparalleled commitment to their students as individuals, being accessible as mentors and fostering their students’ growth.

The MA program instilled a renewed confidence in Lia, preparing her for the business world by not only approaching problems analytically, but also quantitatively. Lia studied political science and international studies as an undergraduate and was fully engaged in qualitative analysis. However, having been removed from quantitative reasoning, she was unsure of her business acumen. We had no qualms she would thrive in the MA program, but her confidence rose tremendously as she sharpened her skills and excelled in the qualitative and quantitative approach to problem solving.

When weighing the opportunities of attending the MA program at WFU, we advised Lia to talk to as many mentors as possible, and to think deliberately about her personal and professional goals. We also wanted to make sure she was energized to fully immerse herself in a year of intense study following four years of undergraduate study.

We can honestly say, attending WFU’s MA Program was the best decision for Lia. The knowledge she gained, the confidence in her business abilities, and the friends and mentors she now has as lifelong influences, had a dramatically positive impact on her and have prepared her for a life of success.”  - Stacey Flur, parent of Lia Flur (’11, MA ’12)

If you want to learn more, there is a terrific website for parents of students who are considering the MA in Management.  This could be the perfect program for your senior!

 

Finding Your Passion

Leading up to Valentine’s Day, the Daily Deac is reflecting on some of the reasons we love Wake Forest.  Today’s reason is:

We help students discover their passions – sometimes ones they didn’t even know they had.

This can happen in a lot of ways.  One of them – hard as it may be for your students to believe – is through Divisional Requirements.  The liberal arts educational model at Wake Forest requires our students to sample classes within five broad classifications of human knowledge: the humanities, literature, the arts, social sciences, and math and natural sciences.  Within each of those division, students have the ability to choose (or avoid) departments in favor of other ones.  Sometimes when a student tries a class in a department he/she didn’t have access to in high school – philosophy, anthropology, Russian, whatever’s your pleasure – that student finds that he/she is really interested and inspired.

One of my fondest memories as an academic adviser was to watch one of my students (now graduated) who decided to embark on a new language for his language requirement.  He chose Arabic because he was interested in the events in the Middle East, and ended up majoring in Political Science and becoming fluent in Arabic, studying in Jordan his junior year.  It was wonderful to watch him discover an interest in Arabic he never thought he had, and to see that manifest itself in a semester abroad.  He found an academic passion.

There are other students here who find volunteer passions.  Whether that is working with Project Pumpkin or the Volunteer Service Corps, or taking an International Service Trip or a Wake Alternative Break, they find impactful activities that help them grow even as they serve others.  This video was done a few years ago about the impact of international service trips, and these students tell their stories better than I ever could.

And while this generation tends to “date” less than mine or yours did, people do still find love at Wake Forest.  It may or may not last forever, but you do see students walking hand in hand or arms around each others’ shoulders on the Quad.  Interesting fact from the Alumni Office from last year: there were 8,643 WFU alumni married to alumni (about 10% of our alumni made what I call ‘advantageous marriages’).

Finally, we also help students discover their passion and help them explore how to live that out in their life in the world of work.  The Office of Personal and Career Development has been at the leading edge of helping students explore their talents, values, skills, and dreams so that they can leave Wake Forest poised to go to a job or graduate school that really suits them (instead of taking any job just because it is available).  You can see the year-by-year activities (buttons at the top of this web page) our students are encouraged to do via the OPCD to get an idea of some of the tools in the toolbox for them to use.

And for parents in Charlotte, NC, we cordially invite you to hear more about how we are helping students find their passion.  Andy Chan, Vice President for Personal and Career Development, is going to be speaking on Thursday, February 21st in Charlotte.  Here is a flyer about this OPCD Event in Charlotte with information about how to register.

Has your student found his or her passion yet?