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Some Food for Thought

Some of my friends and colleagues are kind enough to point out articles about parents and parenting, thinking they might be interesting food for thought for our Deac families.  Today I am going to bring you a few of those types of articles.  Note that the Daily Deac isn’t making a value judgment about whether these are good or bad – that is for you to decide.  But I share them with you in good spirit.

The first one might be coming a little late for those of you with upperclassmen, because you have already experienced having your Deacs home for the summer after Independent Life at College.  This article is called “The Other Nine Months,” and it is about when your college student returns to live home after freshman year has ended.

The second article is written by the mother of a 10th grader, and it is entitled “An Open Letter to My Teenage Son About Drinking.”  Topic is self evident, and the writer states her family’s opinion and values in it.  She also challenges the assumption that all teenagers will experiment with drugs and alcohol – why should that be the norm? – and wants to be sure her son is aware of her ideas and ideals:  ”I get it. My son is growing up, and he’s going to have to make choices for himself.  I want him to spread his wings and discover who he is.  And as much as some people think I’m living under a rock, I do know that he is going to make mistakes along the way.  But, I want him to know where I stand on engaging in behaviors that are at best risky and at worst illegal or life-threatening.  I never want my son to say that I wasn’t clear about my feelings — so I’m writing them out here, for all to see.”  (Aside: as we have said often on the Daily Deac, summer is a great time to have those tough conversations – about alcohol and all other difficult issues.)

Finally, we offer “The Real Goodbye,” which was quoted to us last night by a WFU professor and incoming freshman parent at our Winston-Salem New Student Reception.  This article is poignant and talks about students’ increasing independence (and simultaneous letting go of their parents).

Category: campus life